CUMGAP_081012_429
Existing comment:
Waiting For the Battle That Never Came:
A natural thoroughfare through the Appalachian Mountain barrier, Cumberland Gap assumed great strategic importance in the Civil War. Both sides sought to control the Gap. It changed hands three times, but no battles were fought. Troops garrisoned here, Union and Confederates alike, endured months of inaction and boredom.
Confederate soldier Seth Hannibal Hyatt from Cherokee County, North Carolina, wrote home on April 28, 1863 --
"Dear Father and Mother --:
"As I can get no letters from home to revive or divert the weary mind, I thought I would put in a few leisure moments in pening [sic] you a few lines. Notwithstanding I have nothing new to communicate...
"We have some tolerably heavy scouting to do... We have learned that there is no army this side Lexington, Kentucky. Hense [sic] we do not apprehend any danger of an attack here soon... We have no war news, everything seems to be still. What can be the matter with the Feds? This time last year they were tickling us on ev'ry rib...
"I would prefer being in a country where we could have access to the luxuries of country produce. But we cannot expect to live in clover all the time. Since writing the above we have drawed [sic] meal, bacon and rice. This is the Robinsons and Campbells day to cook, they have dinner and supper almost ready (for we take both together)...
"Col. Heart sent a scout down to Barbersville on the 26th inst. They returned yesterday with five yanks. They took six in the town and one started to run when he instantly bit the dust...
"Write soon hope to get some letters today. Your devoted son
"Seth H. Hyatt"
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